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PIMP My drawing ’11 May 23, 2011

Posted by leskanturek in Drawing, Events, In class assignments, Pimp my drawing, Student work.
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The fifth annual (okay…maybe not exactly annual) “Pimp My Drawing” Spring 20011…

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The Foolish Corpse April 8, 2010

Posted by leskanturek in Drawing, Events, Student Post, Student work, Surreal.
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By Masuko Jo

Honestly, I have never been too fond of using tablets, nor been nice about admiring digital art, but I’ll have to admit, using a screen tablet was quite a joy. 
On April 1st, I took part in the Foolish Corpse event, which was held in the Aronson gallery at Parsons the New School for Design.

As stated on the thousands of flyers found taped all around the school walls, “Foolish Corpse is a collaboration between the Parsons Foundation and Illustration programs. It is a live drawing event with rotating team and three video projectors that create one scroll-like image…” No matter how many times I’ve read that, I didn’t have the slightest clue on what we were going to do, until I arrived at the gallery, and begun drawing on the Wacom Cintiq screen tablets! It was absolutely fascinating. What I had drawn on the screen, projected on the walls in front of us! (To someone who isn’t at all tech-savvy, this was like witnessing a Leprechaun place a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow.) 

(above) Students drawing on the Wacom Cintiq Screen Tablets while being projected on to wall.
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There were three of these large screen tablets placed next to each other, and as we drew on the screen, we had to be aware of what the artists sitting around us were doing. We had to interact our image with theirs, like “the Surrealist parlor game, the Exquisite Corpse!” In addition to that, other students who brought their own laptops were able to use Wacom Cintiq Intuos tablets to draw and upload their work into a drop box to be used as “raw material” for the images projected on the screen. 

(above) Students using the Wacom Cintiq Intuos tablets
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This might have been the most multi-tasking position I have ever put myself in. On top of having to make sure that the image I was creating moved fluidly with the other two screens projected on the wall, and having to keep uploading small drawings others have uploaded on the drop box to incorporate into the piece, we had random words thrown at us to enhance our piece towards a new direction! This was absolutely insane, but insanely absolute! 

(above) Collaborative illustrations projected on wall

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It was a great opportunity for me to experience Wacom’s products, and really gave a new perspective of digital art (It’s a lot more difficult than you think!) The Foolish Corpse event was a fun event where I was able to collaborate with strangers in creating hilarious pieces, and I hope there will be a similar event soon to come again! ♡

Illustration Lives- The Artist’s Personal Touch March 17, 2010

Posted by leskanturek in Animation, Events, Student Blog posts, Student Post.
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Post by a Class Member

There is a subdued underground anxiety these days about the future of traditional Illustration.  Digital media is slowly suffocating print journalism as society embraces all things pixel-ed.  Will video and RGB-doodles crush the conventional beauty of watercolors and oils?  I do not believe so and my chance meeting with Peter de Sève supported the idea that Illustrators need not worry.

It was Friday, March 5, and I was attending the opening reception at the Society of Illustrator’s, “Annual Exhibition:  Illustrators 52”.  Peter de Sève, the character developer for Mulan, Walt Disney Home Entertainment (my personal fave); Finding Nemo, Disney Enterprises, Inc./Pixar; and Ice Age, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, was there in full animated glory.  He was gracious, humorous, and above all – genuine.  How refreshing to meet a grounded, yet famed Illustrator.

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(above  left) This was me talking to Peter  during  Cocktail Hour, Sketch by Peter de Sève.

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Of course, upon learning that Peter illustrated the much-loved characters of Ice Age, I rapidly searched the bowels of my brain to come up with something brilliant about the intellectual relationship of the wooly mammoth and sloth characters.  Naturally, the only beast I could recall from the series was the ill-fated dodo bird.

“Brilliant”, I thought, that the space in my head could only conjure up a brainless feathered species.  It would be like telling Audrey Hepburn that her rendition of Moon River inspired me to become a song artist.  Lame.

After a lot of dull “Wow!” and “Interesting!” exclamations on my part, I  managed to garner some very inspiring thoughts from Peter.  Namely, that he found his commissioned illustrations to BE his art.  Often, we-students are trained that client work is not art that will fulfill us rather it is a necessary evil in the labyrinth of competition among artists.  Peter debunked this thought; specifically, with his passion for his New Yorker covers.

The laughter we shared inspired me to “amazon” his book, A Sketchy Past, which is a delicious volume of his sketches and finished watercolors.  The book details Peter’s continuing passion for his work and his stubbornness in ensuring the yummy flourishes he adds to commissions remain in tact.  The satiated pictures included here demonstrate this illustrative execution.

(above) Two of three naked butts to be on the cover of The New Yorker Magazine (left) Beach Bum, The New Yorker, 2005,  (right) Through the Wringer, The New Yorker, 2008

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(above) an Illustration from a new children’s book after Peter’s own family – his father and mother-in-law pictured here .  The Duchess of Whimsy, Penguin Philomel Books, 2009

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(above) Self-Portrait with Art Director, Art Direction magazine, 1994

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Peter declares his illustrations to be personal assignments and finds satisfaction by adding his own commentary to The New Yorker covers.  He manages to turn even a bland business commuter into a scrumptious plump beast daintily prancing through our soot-covered subway system.  And it is through this transformation that Peter finds peace with his art.

Alas, that is why Illustration will never die.  Illustrators bring rainbows, ruffles and renaissance to an otherwise loud and rushing world.  It was a pleasure meeting Peter de Sève, a talent who captures the glint of love and the furrow of doubt in any beast and implores personal flair to every creature he creates.  Bravo.

Peter is a 1980 graduate of the Parsons School of Design Illustration Dept.
http://www.peterdeseve.com/
http://peterdeseve.blogspot.com/

Artfully Unforgotten/Afghanistan Auction December 15, 2009

Posted by leskanturek in Events, Political and Social Art, Student Blog posts, Student Post.
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Post by Samantha Perlman

December 3rd was the Artfully Unforgotten auction to raise funds for voices of Afghanistan.  Artfully Unforgotten, a non-profit organization that focuses on advocacy through the arts focuses on many different areas, this time it’s women in Afghanistan. A portion of the funds raised  will be donated to the Business Council of Peace (which supports women entrepreneurs in Afghanistan) and the Mashale Noor School . Afghan women are rebuilding their country as the Taliban are working to ruin it, and they greatly appreciate our efforts to help. The event was held at the Best Buy Loft in Soho, the space is owned by Best Buy, who is a sponsor. The loft was large and the artwork hung along an exposed brick wall with corresponding bidding papers below.

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(Above) Pieces being bid on, far Right Heather Metcalf and family (photo taken by Wendy Popp)

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(Above) left art up for auction by Allison Mehner, Right art by Lyejm Kallas-Lewis

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(Above) Tryptich by Evan Goodman

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Immediately when my mother and I walked in, we were ushered over to the check-in table where we were checked off the guest list and then pointed in the direction of the raffle table, we filled out tickets and moved towards the snack table, there was wine and cheese, and RED VELVET CUPCAKES!
The auction featured the artwork of teachers, students, and group projects from the Parsons School of Design Illustration department. We slowly walked along the wall of art and quickly realized that if you wanted to bid on a piece, you wrote your name and contact information on the pieces of paper below. Of course my mother bid on mine artwork. The pieces ranged from $15 minimum all the way to $80 min. for a set of three paintings.

(Above) Piece by Deborah Mouloudji being (photo by Sam Perlman),  Right art  by Sam Perlman

There was a big turn out of guests and most of the pieces of art sold. I saw some fellow students and teachers, also friends and family of event planners, everyone was there to support this good cause, for instance the guest list-checkers were two young boys, who must have been the sons of one of the staff.
There was time for schmoozing, bidding, and roaming the refreshment table, the head of the event spoke about the Afghan women the auction was benefiting, (a trailer of the video we watched in class was played).  Heather thanked everyone for coming and donating, Immediately after that was the drawing for the raffle, I didn’t win but there were gift baskets and CDs and women’s clothing as prizes, following that was another period of bidding and schmoozing. Another thank you from the head of events which concluded the bidding. Winning bidders were directed to pay for their pieces at the end of the evening.

(Above) left art by Nadilyn Beato, Right art by Masuko Jo