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P.O.V Assignment/Fall ’10 August 30, 2010

Posted by leskanturek in Class Assignments, Class Topics, P.O.V., Point of View, Visual Narrative.
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Sketches due: 9/13
Finish due: 9/20

For the finish you will be handing in 2 sequential Color illustrations.

The heart of this assignment is to consider and change the point of view you would normally take when illustrating.
• Select a story from one of the audio recordings of Lou Beach’s “420 characters”. or read the stories yourself at Lou’s site. They are stories “limited to 420 characters each, (including spaces and punctuation) by illustrator Lou Beach.  The audio recordings are by Jeff Bridges and Ian McShane.
• Imagine yourself as a character in a story and draw from that perspective, both emotionally and physically. It can be the P.O.V. of the main character or  of  a minor one,  the character that you are exploring could even be implied but not explicitly mentioned . It doesn’t even have to be human.

What/who are you looking at and from where? Remember, you are now in the scene, not just a viewer/audience member. Try a range of viewpoints including an extreme POV and see what happens in your sketches. Keep in mind that your point of view encompasses not only a physical perspective but also a mental one.

Take the story of The Wizard of OZ as an example (obviously more than 420 words): Would the Wicked Witch of the West see Dorothy differently through her point of view than the way Glinda the good witch sees her? Think about the slides we saw in class of a child’s point of view, there was the physical (under the table or being baptized), but also the the children’s drawing of the WTC on 9-11.

Do your research. Act out the scene with some friends. Take pictures. Research your subject. Don’t take anything for granted. What would you really experience or see if you were that character. Think of the story you selected as a beginning point. Should the story take place in a different locale or time period? That’s up to you. Lou’s stories are  open to a lot of interpretations.

Your finished illustration should be roughly 8.5” X 11” either horizontal or vertical. I’d like at least 6 sketches from different points of view. Not done in your sketchbook. You can do more than 6 of course and pick more than one story.

Your sketches do not have to be 8.5” X 11”. As long as they are proportionate to a rectangle. They don’t have to be in color but you might want to indicate what colors will be in the sketch.

P.O.V Assignment/Fall ’08 September 8, 2008

Posted by leskanturek in Class Assignments, Class Topics, P.O.V., Point of View.
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Sketches due: 9/15
Finish due: 9/22

For the finish you will be handing in 1 Color illustration.

The heart of this assignment is to consider and change the point of view you would normally take when illustrating.
• Select a simple story one that everyone is familiar with that has multiple characters.
• Imagine yourself as a character in a story and draw from that perspective, both emotionally and physically. It can be a minor character that you are exploring. It doesn’t even have to be human.

What/who are you looking at and from where? Remember, you are now in the scene, not just a viewer/audience member. Try a range of viewpoints including an extreme POV and see what happens in your sketches. Keep in mind that your point of view encompasses not only a physical perspective but also a mental one. ie: Would the wicked witch of the west see Dorothy differently through her point of view? Think about the slides we saw in class of a child’s point of view, there was the physical (under the table or being baptized), but also the the children’s drawing of the WTC on 9-11.

Do your research. Act out the scene with some friends. Take pictures. Research your subject. Don’t take anything for granted. What would you really experience or see if you were that character. Think of the story you selected as a beginning point. Should the story take place in a different locale or time period? That’s up to you.

Your finished illustration should be roughly 11” X 17” either horizontal or vertical. I’d like at least 6 sketches from different points of view. Not done in your sketchbook. You can do more than 6 and you can include ideas other than POV just as long as you have 6 POV sketches.

Your sketches do not have to be 11 X 17. As long as they are proportionate to a rectangle. They don’t have to be in color but you might want to indicate what colors will be in the sketch.

I want you, yes YOU! July 11, 2008

Posted by leskanturek in Art History, Class Topics, Point of View.
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Flagg's Uncle Sam

Flagg's Uncle Sam

Illustrator James Montgomery Flagg was not the first artist to exploit a specific point of view in an illustration. He modeled his famous 1917 recruiting poster of Uncle Sam appealing directly to the viewer after an English WWI recruiting poster. The British version (created 3 years earlier) depicted Lord Herbert Kitchener, Britain’s then Secretary of State for War, in the same pose . Since then Flagg’s image of Uncle same has become an icon and like all icons it’s invited it’s share of homages, knockoffs, and parodies.

Below are some of the ones I’ve encountered so far:

(Left) Lord Kitchener by Alfred Leete, (middle) Uncle Cthulhu “I Want You” by Patrick McEvoy http://www.comicnerd.com, (Right) Smoky Bear by Rudolph Wendelin (?)

(Left) the Committee to Help Unsell the War, 1971., (middle) Harry Potter, Warner Brothers, (Right) Santa “I Want You to Spend a Lot” by Pierre Bourgeault

I’d welcome any images you come across that you feel fit the bill. But I’d like the credit for the artist/creator too. If it’s an older image and the artist is unknown that’s okay as long as you research it and give me the url of the site or the book where you found it.

ccom